New technology makes decayed teeth repair themselves
Image:Jaromir Chalabala/Shutterstock

The technique, developed at King’s College London, uses electrical currents to trigger minerals in the tooth to repair damage.

It’s called Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralisation, and the result is that a cavity is remineralised with calcium and phosphate painlessly - no drills, injections or fillings required. 

"The way we treat teeth today is not ideal. When we repair a tooth by putting in a filling, that tooth enters a cycle of drilling and refilling as, ultimately, each 'repair' fails," said professor Nigel Pitts of King's College London Dental Institute in a press release

"Not only is our device kinder to the patient and better for their teeth, but it's expected to be at least as cost-effective as current dental treatments."

Of course, the technique has its limits - it’s unlikely to work on decay and cavities that are too far along, and won’t be able to regrow teeth.

But according to the researchers, this technology, which should be available within three years, will effectively stimulate teeth to heal themselves and may also be able to whiten them.