Donna Yates/Twitter

This hilarious Twitter account uses Lego to show the realities of academia

"This isn't the paper I wanted to read. Write a different one. - Peer Reviewer."

JACINTA BOWLER
24 APR 2016
 

We all know that life in academia can be exceptionally rewarding, but like every job, it comes with its own set of weird and wonderful problems. Whether it's an experiment that fails, a grant that's rejected, or maybe you've just run out of synonyms for the word "results", don’t worry, this Twitter page gets you.

Created by archaeologist Donna Yates, the LegoAcademics page is a nod to all the trials and tribulations that academics experience on a daily basis, and it somehow makes them less tragic and more hilarious, by acting them out with toy figurines.

 

Started in 2014, the page now has over 56,000 followers, and follows an all-Lego, all-female cast of Dr Red, Dr Gold, Dr Grey and Dr Black.

"People follow them with a sense of delight because they are normal office frustrations," said Yates in an interview with New Scientist. "The bigger point is that we show women scientists going through this, and that’s part of the excitement surrounding the Lego set and the account - not just the academic jokes, but the fact that these are female academics in normal academic situations, being normal scientists."

The LegoAcademics Twitter account was inspired when Lego launched a range of female scientists back in 2014, called the Research Institute. Created by geologist Ellen Kooijman, the set included figurines of a female chemist, paleologist and astronomer.

The Research Institute collection sold out incredibly quickly, but Yates managed to grab one, and has been using it to create hilarious Lego situations ever since.

Check out our favourite tweets below, and follow LegoAcademics on Twitterhere.

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