Maia Weinstock/Flickr

Come quick, Lego's thinking about making a female NASA scientist range

Yes yes yes.

FIONA MACDONALD
1 AUG 2016
 

Lego has made some pretty awesome toys in the past. We've seen female scientists, dinosaurs, and even an adorable replica of the Mars Curiosity Rover.  

But now a new Lego Ideas proposal wants to turn some of NASA's most famous female scientists into a range of awesome figurines, and we're kinda freaking out over here.

 

Lego Ideas is an initiative where the public can submit and vote on future toy ranges, and the ones with the most support usually end up going into production.

That's how some of their earlier sciencey toys have been funded in the past, and now we're less than 1,000 votes away from getting Lego to consider making the 'Women of NASA' range a reality, too - Lego picks from the proposals that hit 10,000 votes from the public, but the more votes, the better.

The set was created by Maia Weinstock, the deputy editor of MIT News, and it features five of our ultimate role models in life: Margaret Hamilton, Katherine Johnson, Sally Ride, Nancy Grace Roman, and Mae Jemison.

"Women have played critical roles throughout the history of the US space program, AKA NASA," Weinstock wrote in her proposal.

"Yet in many cases, their contributions are unknown or under-appreciated - especially as women have historically struggled to gain acceptance in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)."

Katherine Johnson, shown below in both Lego and human form, is a mathematician and space scientist, who calculated and verified the trajectories for the Mercury and Apollo programs - including Apollo 11. 

 

Her figurine comes with her own work desk, and one of the original NASA computers:

Lego5Maia Weinstock

Another famous NASA computer scientist included in the range is Margaret Hamilton, who worked at NASA in the 1960s and helped code the flight software for the Apollo mission.

You can see her Lego figurine below, next to one of the most iconic images of her, where she's photographed beside listings of the software developed by the team she was in charge of at the time.

Lego4Maia Weinstock

Mae Jemison needs little introduction. The medical doctor became the first African American woman in space in 1992, and has since founded her own technology company that encourages students to get into science.

Here she is as a Lego model, with the blueprints for (presumably) the Space Shuttle Endeavour, which carried Jemison around Earth 126 times:

Lego1Maia Weinstock

Astronaut Sally Ride is also featured in the Lego line-up, alongside an actual miniature Space Shuttle.

Ride was the first American woman in space back in 1983, and is also a physicist and an educator, passionate about encouraging girls to study science.

Lego2Maia Weinstock

Then we have Nancy Grace Roman, AKA the Mother of Hubble.

The astronomer was one of the first female executives at NASA, who developed NASA's astronomy research program and helped plan the Hubble Space Telescope mission.

Even better, her Lego figurine actually comes with a little model of Hubble itself (we're dying!), plus a miniature Hubble image. 

Lego3Maia Weinstock

You can vote here to let Lego know you want them to make the set IRL - the more votes it gets, the better chance the set has.

And how could you not? Look how badass these guys are:

Lego6Maia Weinstock 

Lego7Maia Weinstock 

Lego8Maia Weinstock 

Lego9Maia Weinstock 

H/T: Slate

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