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(Su Dong/China Daily)

US Intelligence Issues a Warning About Russian, Chinese Space And Counterspace Weapons

Nobody panic.

24 FEB 2018

Every year, the Department of National Intelligence (DNI) releases its Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community.

This annual report contains the intelligence community's assessment of potential threats to US national security and makes recommendations accordingly.


In recent years, these threats have included the development and proliferation of weapons, regional wars, economic trends, terrorism, cyberterrorism, etc.

This year's assessment, which was released on February 8th, 2018, was certainly a mixed bag of warnings. Among the many potential threats to national security, the authors emphasized the many recent developments taking place in space.

According to their assessment, the expansion of the global space industry, growing cooperation between the private and public sector, and the growth of various states in space, could constitute a threat to US national security.

Naturally, the two chief actors that are singled out were China and Russia. As they indicate, these countries will be leading the pack in the coming years when it comes to expanding space-based reconnaissance, communications and navigation systems.

This will not only enable their abilities (and those of their allies) when it comes to space-based research, but will have military applications as well.

As they state in the section of the report titled "Space and Counterspace":

"Continued global space industry expansion will further extend space-enabled capabilities and space situational awareness to nation-state, nonstate, and commercial space actors in the coming years, enabled by the increased availability of technology, private-sector investment, and growing international partnerships for shared production and operation… All actors will increasingly have access to space-derived information services, such as imagery, weather, communications, and positioning, navigation, and timing for intelligence, military, scientific, or business purposes."


A key aspect of this development is outlined in the section titled "Emerging and Disruptive Technology", which addresses everything from the development of AI and internet technologies to additive manufacturing and advanced materials.

In short, it not just the development of new rockets and spacecraft that are at issue here, but the benefits brought about by cheaper and lighter materials, more rapid information sharing and production.

"Emerging technology and new applications of existing technology will also allow our adversaries to more readily develop weapon systems that can strike farther, faster, and harder and challenge the United States in all warfare domains, including space," they write.

Specifically, anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons are addressed as the major threat. Such technologies, according to the report, have the potential to reduce US and allied military effectiveness by disrupting global communications, navigation and coordination between nations and armies.

These technologies could be destructive, in the form of anti-satellite missiles, but also nondestructive - i.e. electromagnetic pulse (EMP) devices. As they indicate:

"We assess that, if a future conflict were to occur involving Russia or China, either country would justify attacks against US and allied satellites as necessary to offset any perceived US military advantage derived from military, civil, or commercial space systems. Military reforms in both countries in the past few years indicate an increased focus on establishing operational forces designed to integrate attacks against space systems and services with military operations in other domains."

The authors further anticipate that Russian and Chinese destructive ASAT technology could reach operational capacity within a few years time.

To this end, they cite recent changes in the People's Liberation Army (PLA), which include the formation of military units that have training in counter-space operations and the development of ground-launched ASAT missiles.

While they are not certain about Russia's capability to wage ASAT warfare, they venture that similar developments are taking place.

Another area of focus is the development of directed-energy weapons for the purpose of blinding or damaging space-based optical sensors.

This technology is similar to what the US investigated decades ago for the sake of strategic missile defense - AKA the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI).

While these weapons would not be used to blow up satellites in the conventional sense, they would be capable of blinding or damaging sensitive space-based optical sensors.

On top of that, the report cites how Russia and China continue to conduct on-orbit activities and launching satellites that are deemed "experimental".

A good example of this was a recent proposal made by researchers from the Information and Navigation College at China's Air Force Engineering University.

The study which detailed their findings called for the deployment of a high-powered pulsed ablative laser that could be used to break up space junk.

While the authors admit that such technology can have peaceful applications - ranging from satellite inspection, refueling and repair - they could also be used against other spacecraft.

While the United States has been researching the technology for decades, China and Russia's growing presence in space threatens to tilt this balance of power.

Moreover, there are the loopholes in the existing legal framework - as outlined in the Outer Space Treaty - which the authors believe China and Russia are intent on exploiting:

"Russia and China continue to publicly and diplomatically promote international agreements on the nonweaponization of space and "no first placement" of weapons in space. However, many classes of weapons would not be addressed by such proposals, allowing them to continue their pursuit of space warfare capabilities while publicly maintaining that space must be a peaceful domain."

For example, the Outer Space Treaty bars signatories from placing weapons of mass destruction in orbit of Earth, on the Moon, on any other celestial body, or in outer space in general.

By definition, this referred to nuclear devices, but does not extend to conventional weapons in orbit.

This leaves room for antisatellite platforms or other conventional space-based weapons that could constitute a major threat.

Beyond China and Russia, the report also indicates that Iran's growing capabilities in rocketry and missile technology could pose a threat down the road.

As with the American and Russian space programs, developments in space rocketry and ICBMs are seen as being complimentary to each other:

"Iran's ballistic missile programs give it the potential to hold targets at risk across the region, and Tehran already has the largest inventory of ballistic missiles in the Middle East. Tehran's desire to deter the United States might drive it to field an ICBM. Progress on Iran's space program, such as the launch of the Simorgh SLV in July 2017, could shorten a pathway to an ICBM because space launch vehicles use similar technologies."

All told, the report makes some rather predictable assessments. Given China and Russia's growing power in space, it is only natural that the DNI would see this as a potential threat.

However, that does not mean that one should assume an alarmist attitude. When it comes to assessing threats, points are awarded for considering every contingency.

But if history has taught us anything, it's that assessment and realization are two very different things.

Remember Sputnik? The lesson there was clear. Don't panic!

This article was originally published by Universe Today. Read the original article.


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